Saving Four Innocent Chairs from the Dumpster

This past summer, my husband Chris and I were enjoying a bike ride in our neighborhood.  It was a beautiful day, and at the time Chris was still clinging to a tiny shred of hope that his wife might actually be sane.

That hope was about to be dashed.

The Chairs That Needed Me

We came across these four chairs, which someone had kicked to the curb.

chairs before rehab

A few people were looking at them, but everyone wound up walking away.  They were destined for the dumpster.  So of course I had to step in.

At first glance they looked like rattan chairs. But on closer examination the frames appeared to be oak.  The non-loadbearing cross-braces were a mixture of bamboo and rattan.

Bamboo - cane - oak chair before rehab

So they were very solid.  They just needed a lot of work, starting with a good cleaning.

Cleaning

Using fine steel wool, I scrubbed them down with denatured alcohol. Then I rinsed each chair with water.  Cleaning was probably the most time-consuming part of rehabbing these chairs.  Every nook and cranny of every chair needed to be cleaned.  One chair in particular was heavily covered in black soot.

Reupholstering

I thought that reupholstering these chairs would be a snap.  The seats looked removable.  I was hoping to remove each seat before I cleaned the chairs.

Turned out the seats were built into the chairs.  They would be impossible to remove without destroying the chairs.  So I removed the fabric and padding.  Each chair had a tack strip for the seat cushion which also had to be removed.

furniture rehab removing the chair pads

Apparently whoever built these chairs didn’t intend for them to ever be reupholstered.

As a solution, Chris cut new seat bottoms from scrap plywood he had on hand.  We would secure them to the top of the original seats once I added the new cushions.

tools-for-working-on-the-chair-pads

Finally the fun began:  Choosing the fabric.  I chose an outdoor fabric with a fresh, tropical pattern.  Then I used my trusty old electric carving knife to cleanly and easily cut the foam for the new chair pads. For more detail on how I reupholster chair pads, check out this post.

Refreshing the Wood

Using a rag, I wiped the chairs down with Howard Restor-A-Finish in Golden Oak.

Fixing the Caning

Some of the original caning was coming unraveled and some was missing. I had never worked with caning before, and I ordered the wrong size.  It was a bit thinner than the original caning.

But I only needed to replace the caning in a few areas, so I used it anyway. And it was very easy to work with once I soaked it in water for 30 minutes.

I figured that once the new caning was stained to match the chairs, the discrepancy in size wouldn’t be very visible anyway.

Furniture rehab new caning

Turned out the new caning didn’t absorb stain very well, but luckily we have many half-used cans of stain on hand, and eventually I found one that worked.

Save up to 60% on Black Friday

Finish

I applied a coat satin finish to each chair.  This went quickly since the finish could be applied with a rag.  This really made a difference, giving the chairs an elegant, subtle gleam.

Almost Done

A few of the metal feet on the chair legs were missing, so Chris attached new ones, and then he attached the newly-upholstered chair seats.

 

Were these chairs really worth all the work?  Well, it would have been a shame for them to wind up in the landfill, but if I had it to do over, I just might have left them on the curb hoping that someone else would rescue them.  And I really should have learned my lesson after the chair project I did earlier this year.

Indoor/Outdoor Chairs

But now that all the work is behind me, I love these chairs.

Especially because of the outdoor fabric, they look elegant yet informal.  And they are so versatile:  Great for additional indoor seating or for garden parties.

furniture rehab tropical fabric

Bamboo - cane - oak chairs after rehab

Chairs after rehab

They are still not perfect, but they are old so imperfection is part of the charm.  And they are a far cry from what they were before.

before

One More Rescue

So in summer I impulsively rescued those four sad chairs that needed a ton of work.

Meanwhile, at an estate sale, Chris found a little mid-century bar that barely needed anything.  But it wouldn’t work, or fit, in our house.

No problem.  It turned out to be a fun little addition to our patio for a few late-summer get-togethers.

Midcentury bar

This is post is for entertainment only and not a tutorial.


Disclosure: Affiliate Links are used in this post.

Sources:

Howard Restor-A-Finish is a wonderful product for refreshing furniture.  It’s quick and easy to apply, so we use it all the time in our furniture rehab projects.  It is available in many stain colors, and I used the Golden Oak finish for the chairs.

The lovely finish I used on the chairs was General Finishes Arm-R-Seal in Satin.


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Creepy Plants and Gleaming Pumpkins: My Fall Decor

As wonderful and carefree as summer is, I’m usually not sad when it ends.  I love this change of seasons:  The crisp, chilly air, the changing colors, the spiderwebs hanging in the walkway.  Okay, maybe not so much the spiderwebs.

But in fall we have to take the good with the creepy.  So I have two little decor projects to share – one slightly creepy and one the visual equivalent of comfort food.

We’ll start with slightly creepy.

1.  A Creepy Little Bush

Recently I was at my local nursery looking for winter pansies when I stumbled upon something much more beautiful – and just a bit haunting:

A cushion bush (Calocephalus ‘Silver Stone’).

Cushion bush

The plant tag even described the branches as “ghost white.”  I loved the slightly creepy look of this little starter plant.  And it was on sale, so how could I resist.

The Pot

I could just see it in a black and white themed container on my front porch.  And I happened to have a tall white pot that would elevate this plant so that it would be noticed next to the front door.

cushion bush with french pot

Adding Height and Contrast

Obviously, I would need some height in this potted arrangement – something taller than the cushion bush.  And something dark to act as a background so that the bush’s ghostly, twisted branches would really stand out.  But another plant would add too much texture.

So I remembered these dried ornamental leaves from an old arrangement.

Dried exotic leaves

I don’t even know what they are, really, but their thin stems would make it easy to stake them into the soil behind the cushion bush – after I spray painted the leaves black.

The Creepiness

I wanted the container to look beautiful and slightly creepy.  And what is more vaguely disturbing than a baby doll head.  I’d had this little concrete baby doll head for years, and no one but me has ever liked it.  So it was perfect.

Fall decor cushion bush

The Crowning Touch

I arranged the container in a black plastic pot and set it inside the tall white pot.  I elevated the plastic container with flat stones until it stood an inch or two above the top of the white pot.

Fall decor black and white

And then I bought an inexpensive grapevine wreath at the craft store, spray painted it black, and cut it so that it would easily  fit around the pot.

black and white fall decor

This way, the scene is elevated a bit, yet the plastic pot inside is somewhat concealed.

The long black leaves are a great backdrop for the white branches.

cushion bush

The black and white theme looks good with our charcoal front door.

Black and white planting container fall decor

I was tempted to do more – maybe add a jolt of an unexpected color, or add more creepiness, but adding more of anything would have detracted from the ghostly bush, so I decided to stop right there.

black and white fall decor

Since both the plant and the wreath were on sale, and I already had everything else, this container cost me around $5 to put together.

Closeup cushion bush with small statuary item

Are you ready for some color?  Let’s go inside.

2.  Gleaming Little Pumpkins

Metallic pumpkins are hot this year.  And although I’m not one to jump on every decor bandwagon that comes along, I love the warmth and beauty of metallic finishes this time of year.

So I bought a bag of little pumpkins.

small decor pumpkins

I wanted to try coating them using sheets of gold leaf, but once at the craft store I found “premium gold leaf finish” paint.  So I bought one in classic gold and one in copper.

I made the mistake of trying the copper first on a couple of pumpkins. The paint made them look more pink than copper.

pumpkins being painted

So for damage control, I wound up painting over the copper with the gold paint.

On most of the pumpkins, I used a damp paper towel to wipe off a little of the gold paint after I applied it – a sort of mini rag-rolling project.  I wanted the pumpkins to still look real, but with a slight metallic gleam.

Once the gold foundation was dry, then I used the copper paint sparingly in just a few places to add a little more patina.  Again I muddled the paint with a wet paper towel after I applied it.

fall decor metallic pumpkins flatlay

I do like the warm glow of these pumpkins.  It’s a look that will get me past Halloween and into Thanksgiving.

fall decor metallic pumpkins

While painting the pumpkins, a failed attempt at using fallen birch leaves as stencils led to a little discovery: The birch leaves looked beautiful with a thin coat of gold paint, accented by just a touch of copper paint on the edges.

fall decor painted leaves

For now I’ve scattered the leaves and the pumpkins around the living room.

fall decor pumpkin with hydrangeas and love-lies-bleeding
Pumpkin with dried hydrangeas and love-lies-bleeding

pumpkins with books

fall decor metallic pumpkins and painted leaves


Disclosure:  Affiliate links are used in this post.

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The premium leafing finishes that I used on the pumpkins are made by Precious Metals.  There are 8 colors available.


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Roses, An Easy Patio Tablecloth, and Some Vintage Finds

Are we already in August?  As usual, the summer is going by too fast, and now we only have a few weeks left – with so much we want to do.  So I’ve decided to put this blog down for a little late-summer nap.  While it’s sleeping, I’ll be working on projects to share with you in September.  At least that’s the plan.

And since this is my last post until then, I have all kinds of things to show you.

Costco Roses with Summer Garden Clippings

As I mentioned in my previous post, My Three-Season Greenhouse, my husband gave me two dozen Costco roses for our anniversary.

Arranging roses in a Sunglo Greenhouse

With so many roses, I thought it would be fun to break them into several different arrangements and include some fresh clippings from the garden.

I gathered some of my favorite vases and headed to the greenhouse.

Vintage vases

I had to work fast because it was warm in there and I didn’t want the roses to wither.  I came up with these three arrangements.

Thriller, Filler, Spiller

The old thriller-filler-spiller technique used in container gardening also works well for floral arrangements.

Roses, lady's mantle and love-lies-bleeding in a vintage glass vase

  • Thriller:  Red roses
  • Filler:  Lady’s mantle flowers (Alchemilla mollis or Alchemilla vulgaris)
  • Spiller:  Love-lies-bleeding (Amaranthus caudatus)

I love the fresh green of the lady’s mantle flowers as a substitute for fillers like baby’s breath.  The crimson-tasseled annual called love-lies-bleeding adds a little drama and works nicely with the color of the vintage glass vase.

Manicured

I set yellow roses upright on a spike frog in a vintage milk glass vase for this buttoned-up look for the master bedroom.

yellow roses with dahlias and maidenhair fern in a milk glass vase

I tucked in maidenhair fern (Adiantum) fronds from the shade garden and, around the perimeter, Bishop of Llandaff dahlias.

This late in summer, most of my summer perennials are starting to fade, but because I deadhead these dahlias, the plants bloom for months.

Classic

I put the remaining roses in a tall crystal vase with honeybush (Melianthus major) leaves around the perimeter.  These large silvery leaves add a touch of glamour.

roses with honeybush leaves in a crystal vase

An Easy DIY Patio Tablecloth

Feeling like the summer was getting away from me, I hosted several small get togethers on our patio last week.

Planning the table decor is always half the fun, and I wanted a tablecloth that would complement our china and the chair cushions.

At the fabric store, I came across a whimsical home decor fabric called Sannio Cabana by SMC Swavelle Millcreek.

outdoor table setting

It was 54 inches wide, so I just asked for a 54-inch cut of fabric and hemmed it to have a square tablecloth.

home and garden - outdoor table setting

The square tablecloth worked well with the 42-inch round table.  I positioned it so that it draped elegantly between the chairs yet guests didn’t wind up with a bunch of extra fabric on their laps.

home and garden - square tablecloth on a round table

With a tablecloth this lively, I didn’t need much else in the way of table decor – especially on such a small table.

home and garden - patio party table setting
Photo courtesy of Lisa Wildin

Not wanting to attract bees, I didn’t use any flowers.  The centerpiece was a citronella candle.

home and garden - citronella centerpiece

That and a couple of dryer sheets under the tablecloth did a fairly decent job of keeping pests away.   (Note: For more tips on keeping bugs from crashing a patio party, see this post.)

Minted's Limited Edition Art Prints

My Recent Vintage Finds

I always look forward to the annual garage sale that my neighborhood hosts.  I never participate because I would rather cruise around and see what everyone is selling.

This year I scored with two of these tall fir cabinets with leaded glass doors – for $5 each!  The style is an exact match to the original built-ins in our house.

home and garden - vintage cabinets

They have that “old schoolhouse” smell that I love.  I have several ideas of where to use them in our house, so we’ll see what happens.

My friend, Carolyn, participated in the sale and when I admired these adorable mid century salt and pepper shakers that belonged to her mother, she gave them to me.  Thanks Carolyn!

Mid century salt and pepper shakers

They are perfect for our vintage trailer, the June Bug.

And then while visiting an antique store in the historic Fairhaven district of Bellingham, we found this spike frog to add to my frog collection.

vintage flower frog

I couldn’t resist that rustic patina.

See You in September

I hope those of you living in the Northern hemisphere have a chance to get out and enjoy what is left of your summer.  Let’s meet back here in September!


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Here are a few fun tidbits from around the web, including the fabric (at a lower price than I paid) and the salad plates I used in my table setting.

Late summer design inspiration

Center:  Villeroy & Boch Switch 3 Cordoba Salad Plate  Clockwise from top:  Set of 2 Vintage Flower Frogs  | Sannio Cabana fabric by the yard | 4″ Daisy Milk Glass Ruffletop Vase | Beettle Kill Pine Candleholder with Citronella Candles


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Simple Summer Decor Tips

In this post, we have a fun mix of things:  An elegant budget floral arrangement, a small DIY decor project, and some new decor inspiration for outdoor spaces.

Making Street Market Flowers Look Elegant

Last Sunday at our neighborhood street market, my husband, Chris, offered to buy me a bunch of locally-grown flowers from a vendor.

A $5 bunch seemed large enough.  Curious to see what he would choose, I asked Chris to pick out the flowers.  He chose a colorful bunch of assorted flowers and a single stem each of allium and foxtail lily.

Summer decor: Street market flowers

I wanted to arrange them in a tall fluted glass vase that I found a while back at a vintage market.  I love the simple elegance of the vase.  But when a vase is wider at the top than at the bottom, it’s sometimes hard to get the flowers to stand straight.

So it helps to create a simple tape grid at the top of the vase.

Tip:  Put the water in the vase before creating the tape grid.

vase with tape grid

The grid didn’t need to be very elaborate.  I added decorative rocks to the bottom because the flower stems would be too short otherwise.  (That and it makes the vase more difficult for my cats to tip over.)

The foxtail lily went in the middle as the tallest stem – with other tall stems surrounding it.  Next came larger-diameter blossoms (iris, peony, the allium), and then the filler blossoms and the greens.

Fluted vase with street market flowers

Easy and elegant.

Summer decor: street market flowers

By the way, as some of the flower vendors pointed out, it’s almost time to say goodbye to the beautiful peony until next year.  But is it?  As mentioned in Sunset Magazine and on Sunset’s blog, some farmers in Alaska are growing July-blooming peonies.  So maybe there is a chance that we will be seeing these beauties in the lower 48 and other locations later this summer.

DIY Outdoor Placemats

This project didn’t turn out quite as planned, but I think it’s still worth sharing.

One nice feature of a round table is that it is often easier to add extra place settings than it would be with a rectangular or square table.  Even so, when more place settings are added, the space between them becomes tighter.

So I decided to make some simple placemats for our round patio table.  I wanted to make enough to seat six, so the placemats couldn’t be too large.  And to follow the curve of the round table, the placemats should also be round.  And since they would be used outside, they could look rustic.

Warning:  Weird burlap project ahead!

I had a roll of burlap fabric and some liquid fabric stiffener (which I had never tried before) in my craft room.  So I used a 13-inch platter as a template and cut the burlap.  Of course, as burlap does, it immediately began to fray.

Burlap for placemats

Then, using a painting pad, I saturated each round piece of burlap front and back with the fabric stiffener and laid them flat on parchment paper to dry.

At first I was disappointed to see that the burlap frayed even more after it was saturated.  But then I realized that it was actually kind of a cool look.

The burlap wanted to curl and buckle a bit when wet, so from time to time while it was drying, I pressed it back into place.  I couldn’t wait to see how the pieces looked when they dried.

So of course they took forever to dry.

And when they did, the burlap was indeed very stiff.  No more fraying.  That fabric was not going anywhere now!  I cut off any strands that were sticking out funny or looking too crazy, but I left most of it.

burlap placemats after drying

It does make for an interesting look under outdoor plates, but I should have made them bigger.  And using colored burlap might have been fun for this project.  But here it is.

Summer decor: burlap placements in setting

There was some fabric stiffener left in the tray and I hated to waste it, so I also made some simple napkin rings using rope ribbon and some vintage buttons.

Summer decor: rope napkin rings

Summer decor: summer place setting closeup

A fun (if slightly weird) result for my first experiment with fabric stiffener.

Introducing My New Summer Style Boards

Are you planning a new outdoor space? Or maybe just looking for fresh ideas?

Sometimes it’s easier to be inspired if you have a good visual.  Visit my new 2016 Summer Style Boards page and set the right mood for your outdoor space.

2016 Summer Style Boards


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Plaid:Craft Stiffy Fabric Stiffener


 

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A Bench for Priscilla

An aging pet, an art deco bench, Shutterfly, bedroom design tips, and Pinterest color boards.  How do they all fit together?   Well . . . very loosely in this rambling post.

I have a lot to share with you this time, so let’s start connecting the dots.

An Aging Pet

A few months ago, I shared my little Downton Abbey-inspired master bedroom refresh.  Aside from needing some better bedside lamps, I thought that the project was finished.

But then 15-year-old Priscilla started having trouble jumping up onto the bed.  She tried, only to fall back to the floor.  This girl never used to miss her mark, but now she needed a little help.

Black cat
My loyal buddy.

So I searched for something she could use as a halfway point between the floor and the top of the bed.

An Art Deco Bench

I came across a small art deco bench at a consignment shop.  It was half price in the markdown room, piled so high with other merchandise that I almost missed it.

The upholstery was interesting.

Art Deco Bench as found
Bench as found

But the wood was in excellent condition.

With its rounded edges, the bench could have originally been paired with a waterfall bedroom vanity.  So it was appropriate for a bedroom.  And its small scale was perfect for the limited space I had to work with.

I put it at the foot of the bed, and Priscilla immediately saw the advantage and starting using it to climb up to her favorite napping spot.

Burkedecor.com is all new

I didn’t want her to be without it for long, so I decided to just do a quick reupholster and call it good.

I couldn’t wait to see what was under the purple fabric.  Was the original upholstery still there?  Something beautiful and interesting?

No such luck.

Old upholstery

And it looks better in the photo than it did in real life.

So I removed both fabric layers but kept the padding since it was in surprisingly good condition.

With Priscilla lounging on the front porch, I raced to the fabric store. A floral fabric would look sweet on the bench, so that is what I was after.

And this is what I came home with.

fabric closeup

It is “Avondale Vintage” by Covington Fabric and Design. It reminded me of an antique tapestry.  The pattern depicts old-world hunting and fishing scenes.  I’m a pushover for this sort of thing. And, I reasoned, this was in keeping the bedroom’s Downton Abbey-esque vibe.

I only needed an 18-inch cut, but I asked for 2/3 yard so I could center the scene that I liked the most – which turned out to be the hunting scene.

I spruced up the wood with Howard Restor-A-Finish in Golden Oak.

And then I put the bench back.

fabric detail - art deco bench

Art Deco Bench

Including the sprint to the fabric store, the project took one afternoon.

art deco bench

And Priscilla never missed her bench.

Cat with art deco bench

You may have guessed from the photos that our master bedroom is not huge.  I would still like to find ways to make better use of the space.  And my idea file just got a boost from Shutterfly.

Bedroom Design Tips from Shutterfly

Recently, the folks at Shutterfly reached out to me asking to use some of the images from my master bathroom remodel in a blog post that they are creating.

And they gave me this gorgeous bedroom design guide to share with my readers.   Full of  simple and practical advice, the guide focuses on working with a small space.  But I think most of the tips can be applied to bedrooms of any size – or even rooms other than bedrooms.

Clicking on the summary image below will take you to the full version of this guide

25 Easy Ways to Make a Bedroom Look Bigger
Image courtesy of Shutterfly

Pinterest Color Boards

The folks at Shutterfly also invited me to populate a few of the home decor color boards that they have on Pinterest as part of their post 200 Inspiring Color Schemes for the Home.

White is hot right now.  My Pinterest and Instagram feeds are awash with white rooms.  And recently barely-there pastels have started to cautiously creep onto the scene.

Done right, these trendy wall and trim colors are gorgeous, and they definitely have their place in interior decor (see hints 20 and 21 above).  I’ll probably be using white in our upcoming laundry room remodel.

But I must admit that I’m often drawn to the drama and romance of rich colors.  So I loved it that the colors that Shutterfly gave me to work with were unapologetically rich.

One argument for whites is that richer, deeper wall colors are not neutral enough to support changes in art and decor, but I don’t agree. Many rich colors can serve as neutrals. They just have to be chosen carefully.

So if you get a chance, check out these Pinterest boards for some design inspiration ranging from the trendy to the classic.  Some of the images I used were my own, but many were borrowed from other sources.

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A Lapse in Judgment Becomes Garden Art

In a recent post, An Old Stereo Cabinet is Transformed, I picked on my long-suffering husband, Chris, because he brought home an abandoned piece of furniture that didn’t seem to be worth the trouble of rehabbing.  But what I didn’t mention is that, around the same time, I did the exact same thing.

Only what I brought home was too icky to even bring into the house.

On the Curb for a Reason

If you’ve been reading my blog for a while, you already know that I have a hard time ignoring any piece of interesting furniture that has been kicked to the curb, like this dresser.

One of my hard-learned lessons is that I really should ignore any discarded piece of furniture that has upholstery, cushions, foam – in short, soft surfaces that more often than not harbor bad smells, mold, and even cooties.

But this chair.  Sure it had upholstery and foam, but it also had fun lines.  At one time, I reasoned, this chair must have really been something.  And I could bring it back to its former glory.

Chair as found on curb

My inner voice was screaming “You idiot!” as I packed it into my car.

When I got it home, Chris’s only comment was, “Looks like it’s been sitting outside for a while.”

I was already planning to replace every soft surface, but now the wood was also in question.  What kind of wood-eating insects were living in there?

I was tempted to take it back to the curb where I found it, but it was too late now, and someone might see me.

But no way was this cootie-laden white elephant coming into the house.  I would have to turn it into garden art.

Garden Art and Spider’s Nests

The seat of the chair would become a shallow planter, and the chair would be placed in the shade garden.

Preparing for Paint

I started by removing the upholstery and foam padding.  The chair had been poorly reupholstered with a lavender-colored faux-leather fabric fastened by a million tiny exposed staples.

Removing all the staples was time consuming but it gave me a chance to obsess over my poor judgment.

Allsop Home & Garden

I uncovered a sturdy set of metal springs in the seat.  They were fastened so well that I decided not to remove them.  I had already been through enough.

I scrubbed the chair clean – what was left of it.  All I had at this point was the wooden frame and an interesting set of seat springs.  Kind of cool!

Choosing the Paint

The lines of the chair would really pop with the right color.  But this chair was large.  If I painted it a bright color, it would look gaudy – like a clown throne at a circus.

So I needed a strong yet quiet color – something that would look nice in the shade garden.  I decided on a satin Valspar outdoor paint in “Oceanic” – a dignified shade of blue.

I masked off the seat springs before painting.

Garden art: Chair ready for paint

When I turned the chair upside down to paint the underside, I discovered a spider’s nest.  Since I was leaving the chair outside, I just left the nest and avoided spray painting it.  Let the little guys hatch.

Creating a Planting Area

The frame of the seat was about four inches deep, so Chris built a bottom for the frame out of plywood and drilled in a few drain holes.

Now the seat was a shallow planter with a set of springs at the top for interest.

Garden art: chair converted to planter

Planting the Seat

I filled the seat/planting area with good soil and planted a common ground cover – golden creeping Jenny – between the seat springs.   The plants could wind around the springs to create a fun look.

Garden art: Chair with creeping jenny winding around metal springs

Garden art: chair with creeping Jenny winding around springs

In the Shade Garden

My garden is very colorful, especially my back patio.  So I would probably have done this chair differently if it was going to be somewhere other than the shade garden.

But the shade garden is where I can rest my eyes.  It’s filled mostly with greens, whites, and blues – cool colors.  I didn’t want an accent piece that interrupted that quietness.

The chair, large as it is, is understated enough to fit in, yet it still catches the eye.

Garden art: chair converted to planter

Chair as garden art - arm detail

Chair as garden art

The golden creeping Jenny, recently planted, is just starting to spill over the sides of the frame.

I always have a lot to do in the garden, so I wanted a plant for this chair that would be low maintenance.  The creeping Jenny fits the bill.  I just need to cut it back once a year.  And once trimmed back, the metal springs can take over with their structural interest until the plants emerge again.

I played with the idea of fastening chicken wire to the back of the chair so that vines could creep up the back.  But the chair has such fun lines that I didn’t want it to be overpowered by plants.

So the back of the chair is left open to “frame” the ferns behind it.

Garden art - back of chair as frame

Baby Spiders

A few days ago, I was weeding around the chair.  And when I bumped it, dozens of tiny baby spiders cascaded from the arm on a delicate web chain.  The nest had hatched – luckily outside!


Want some fresh ideas for your outdoor space?  Visit my new 2016 Summer Style Boards page.

2016 Summer Style Boards

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An Old Stereo Cabinet is Transformed

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links, which means I receive a small commission if you make a purchase using these links.


A while back, while driving to an appointment, I noticed that someone had left two unwanted pieces of furniture out on the curb.

One piece was a cute older dresser that I knew I could bring back to life with the right paint treatment.

I didn’t pay much attention to the other piece.  I didn’t really know what it was other than a plain and ugly old cabinet.

I texted my husband, Chris, asking if he could bring the truck and pick up the dresser.  Then I scurried off to my appointment.

Later I saw a text from Chris saying that he had picked up both pieces.

From Music to Spirits

The ugly cabinet was a mid century stereo cabinet. Chris wanted to convert it to a liquor cabinet.

I was a little skeptical.   Was this piece really worth the trouble?

Mid Century Furniture Restoration: Cabinet before restoration

At least the legs were unique.

Mid Century Furniture Restoration: the legs

Finding the Look

To me, the wood didn’t look like anything special.  I assumed it was either cheap wood or a cheap veneer over some sort of plywood.  I have seen some fun transformations of mid century furniture using paint, and I thought that paint was the perfect option for this piece.

But a little sanding revealed that the cabinet was actually solid mahogany.  So there would be no paint going on here. Chris loves the look of quality wood.

Bringing the Original Beauty Back

The first thing Chris did was remove the flimsy pegboard back.

Mid Century Furniture Restoration: The back of the cabinet

Mid Century Furniture Restoration: removing the back of the cabinet

He used an orbital sander with 40-grit sandpaper to strip off the original finish – and decades of gunk.  Then he used 120-grit sandpaper to bring out the grain.

He repaired the dings and gouges in the wood using Wunderfil Walnut Wood Filler.  He let that dry and then sanded it.

Then, using a rag,  he applied Daly’s #288 Analine Dye. Over that, also using a rag, he applied a layer of Daly’s dark mahogany wood stain. He left the stain on for only 15 seconds and then wiped it off.


Finally, he applied thee coats of General Finishes Oil & Urethane in Satin using a Verathane applicator for oil-based finishes.  (The applicator is really for finishing wood floors, and it’s larger than Chris needed.  So he just cut it into smaller pieces and made sure he vacuumed away any lint before using it.)

Using 400-grit sandpaper, he hand sanded between each coat.

Damage Control

Now the cabinet was gorgeous, but one thing was still bothering Chris: The hinged lid to the turntable compartment. It was made up of two pieces of heavy mahogany that were joined together only by glue.  And with all the sanding, the glued seam was starting to separate.

So he separated the two pieces and re-joined them using wood dowels and fresh glue.  He set the seam to dry using these huge clamps.

Mid Century Furniture Restoration: Clamps for repairing turntable top

Now the seam is stronger and barely noticeable.

Mid Century Furniture Restoration: repaired turntable top
Can you find the glued seam in this photo?

A New Back

Since the cabinet is already very heavy, he used lightweight but durable tempered hardboard for the  back.

Mid Century Furniture Restoration: New Hardboard Back

Happy Hour!

What was once the turntable compartment is now a great place to store bottles and ice buckets.

Mid Century Furniture Restoration: Interior of turntable compartment

One of my favorite features of this piece is the long brass hinge in this compartment.

Mid Century Furniture Restoration: Turntable compartment hinge

Chris removed one interior shelf to make room for a wine rack.

Wine rack

So with a few refinements, an obsolete piece of furniture was transformed into something useful.

From this . . .

Mahogany stereo cabinet before

To this.

Mid Century Furniture Restoration: Mahogany cabinet after

And the piece is still true to its original form, although I can’t help wondering if it even looked this good when it was brand new.

Mid Century Furniture Restoration: Mahogany cabinet after, doors open

 

Mid Century Furniture Restoration: cabinet from side

Mid Century Furniture Restoration
It’s five o’clock somewhere!

I underestimated this little stereo cabinet.

Lessons learned:  Before I dismiss an old piece of furniture, I will take a closer look, and I won’t assume anything.

So what about the dresser I found on the curb with this cabinet? It’s still in the basement awaiting my attention.

This post is for entertainment only and is not a tutorial.


Resources:

Outfitting a liquor cabinet can be as fun and affordable as you want to make it.

The copper cocktail mugs are high on my wish list.


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DIY Soup Can Planters: An Experiment in Rust

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links, which means I receive a small commission if you make a purchase using these links.


The project that I’m about to share is not for everyone.  But if you like rusty things, then this one’s for you.

A couple of months back, while at the Northwest Flower and Garden Show, I noticed this cute little planter at one of the booths in the marketplace.

inspiration
Cute planter as found at the Northwest Flower and Garden Show

I just loved the rustic patina and wondered if I could duplicate it.

So for fun, I saved a few empty soup cans.  I removed the labels and cleaned them.

before

The Experiment Begins

The patina I wanted to copy looked like a mixture of paint and rust. The paint part was easy enough, but what about the rust?

There are some wonderful rust accelerators on the market, but I wanted to keep this experiment low-budget since, after all, it was only an experiment.

My husband, Chris, offered to whip up a rust accelerator for me using simple household ingredients.  So while he searched Google, I searched through our spray paint cans.

The paint

Since I wanted to experiment with different results, I thinly sprayed the soup cans with random combinations of Rust-Oleum Heirloom White and Rust-Oleum Matte Citron – both paints that I already hand on hand.

I sprayed some cans with only the Heirloom White, some with only the Matte Citron, and some with both colors.  I made sure to leave a few unpainted patches of raw metal – mostly at the top of each can.

Then I rubbed each can with steel wool, especially on the horizontal ribs, to expose even more metal.  The photo below shows it better than I can explain it.

DIY Rusty Patina - partially painted first

You can see that I wasn’t going for accuracy here, which is what is so fun about this project.

The rust

Meanwhile, Chris was mixing up his special batch of rust accelerator in a spray bottle, using a formula he found on this website.

The formula, which should be mixed in a certain order, calls for white vinegar, salt, and hydrogen peroxide.  All fairly innocent ingredients on their own.  But combined, they become a strong, wicked acid. Wear eye protection and gloves when mixing or handling.  Use this mixture in a well-ventilated area and away from anything that you don’t want to rust, stain, or inadvertently kill (sorry lawn). For more safety information, head back to this website.

Before I applied this mixture, I saturated each can with white vinegar. This etches the metal so it will better absorb the mixture.  Then I let the cans dry completely.

Now it was time to apply the magic mixture.  Using a spray bottle, I saturated each can.

It didn’t seem to work – at first.  Then after a few minutes the rust started.  I let each soup can dry, and then I reapplied the mixture.

Soon I just filled a shallow plastic pan with about 1/8-inch of the rust mixture and rolled the cans in the mixture, let them dry, then rolled them again.

I rolled the cans about four times.  It seemed that the mixture was starting to eat through the spray paint a bit.

Finally I was happy with the patina, although I might have overdone it.  The cans did turn out rustier than my original example.

The finish coat

I rinsed each can off with water.  I noticed that if I rubbed the cans at all, the paint would flake off and expose the un-rusted metal underneath.  Not good.

So once the cans were dry, I applied two coats of a clear, flat acrylic finish by Krylon to stabilize the patina and prevent any more paint from flaking off.

All done!  I love the rustic results.

DIY rusty patina

A Planter or a Vase

My cans look like a vintage find from Grandpa’s tool shed.

DIY rusty patina - planter

Since some plants don’t take well to being planted directly into metal containers, I plant them in small plastic pots and then set those pots inside the cans.

The cans also make cute vases.  I think they would be fun as table decor for a rustic-themed reception.

DIY rusty patina - vase

I could also see using cans of varying sizes in groups as a centerpiece.

To avoid having the cans leave a rust stain on any surface, I will use little coasters under them.

This post is for entertainment only and is not a tutorial.


Resources:


Love rusty metal?  Check out the huge supply of rusty things on Etsy.

I especially love these cute industrial planters from Mike and Art Design.

rusty planter
Photo courtesy of Mike and Art Design.

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A Master Bedroom Refresh

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links, which means I receive a small commission if you make a purchase using these links.


My Beloved Rag-Rolled Walls

Years ago, I painted our bedroom walls a buttery yellow, and over that I applied an amberish-colored rag-rolled finish.

The walls are the original textured plaster from the 1920s. The rag-rolled finish gave them an aged patina – almost like the inside of an ancient adobe house.  I was thrilled.

Master Bedroom Refresh: Before refresh with rag rolled walls

I thought I would never want to change it.

Still, it bothered me a little that the walls didn’t really look right with the ceiling or moldings.  So we repainted the ceiling.  And the walls still didn’t look quite right.  The room didn’t look terrible, it was just that nothing was working well together.

Master Bedroom Refresh: Before refresh with rag rolled walls

But I was busy with other things, and I still loved those walls.

A New Color Crush

Along came Downton Abbey.  Eventually I fell in love with the serene blue walls in Cora Crawley’s bedroom.  Sometimes they looked blue, and other times more green – almost blue but not quite.

And that is what I wanted – that “almost blue.”  Which meant the rag rolling had to go.

The right “almost blue” was not easy to find. After much searching and deliberation, I decided on Benjamin Moore’s “Galt Blue” (CW-560).

Master Bedroom Refresh: After refresh with new wall color and window treatments.
Priscilla lounges on her bed.

I love the soft color.  Like in Cora’s bedroom, the color does seem to morph from a seaglass green to a blue depending on the light.

Photographing this color accurately was tricky, but I finally found a camera setting that got it almost right.

Master Bedroom Refresh: After refresh with new wall color and window treatments.

Below the walls look almost green in contrast with the blue in our master bath (Valspar’s Amercian Traditions “Sky Blue”).

Master Bedroom Refresh: After refresh with new wall color and window treatments.

New Bedding

The quilt, which I’d also had for years, didn’t work with the new wall color so I found something more neutral.

Master Bedroom Refresh: After refresh with new wall color and window treatments.

New Window Coverings

I brought in these lace curtains from another room.

Master Bedroom Refresh: new window treatments.

The white aluminum mini blinds were dust collectors.  I wanted something with more contrast, so I replaced them with matchstick bamboo roll-up blinds.

Master Bedroom Refresh: new window treatments.

These surprisingly inexpensive blinds add a bit of natural texture but still give the windows a light and airy look.

The blinds are very sheer.  They don’t completely block out the light or the view.  But since it would take a hover craft for anyone to actually see into these windows, I am not too worried about that.

A Few Little Tweaks

The cheval mirror looked out of place near the window and blocked the little print hanging behind it.

Master Bedroom Refresh: Before refresh with rag rolled walls

A cute antique floor lamp sat in a forgotten corner of the bedroom, so I moved it to where the mirror had been and grouped it with a small table and a chair to create a little sitting area.

Master Bedroom Refresh: After refresh with new sitting area.

The mirror makes more sense next to my husband’s tallboy dresser.  I have a separate little dressing room, so I rarely use that mirror anyway.

Master Bedroom Refresh: After refresh with new wall color.

Striking a Balance

I feel there is a balance between masculine and feminine decor in this room.  Sure, I fantasized about making the room very girly, maybe painting the dressers and the headboard – not that my husband would stand by for that.

But in the end, the masculine-feminine balance is what grounds a room and keeps it interesting.

One Thing Left to Do

I would like to replace the bedside lamps with something more substantial,

Master Bedroom Refresh: After refresh with new wall color and window treatments.

similar to the ones below.



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Three Charming Little Easter Decor Ideas

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links, which means I receive a small commission if you make a purchase using these links


 

Easter falls in March this year, so it’s not too soon for me to share three fun little decor and gift ideas.

1.  Tiny Little Eggshell Planters and Vases

I love it when I can combine a couple of ideas and get something new.  The March edition of Martha Stewart Living had a beautiful little one-page article on using the shells of goose, turkey, and duck eggs to make mini vases and baskets.  Then I saw something on Instagram about starting seedlings in eggshells. Those ideas got me thinking.

I remembered the eggshells that I had painted black as part of my Haunted Hatchlings Halloween scene.  They looked good and, because of a little trick I had discovered, they were also crack and shatter resistant.

I decided to try a variation of those eggshells to make tiny little planters and vases for Easter using the shells of the brown eggs that I had on hand.

DIY Easter Decor: Egg shell vases and planters.

Cracking the Eggs

So for a couple of mornings, when making breakfast, I saved the eggshells. I placed each egg in a shot glass and cracked it carefully around the top with a knife so most of the shell would be left intact but I could still lift off the top and empty the egg easily.

DIY Easter Decor: Egg Shell Planters and Vases step one: cracking the egg

I didn’t worry too much about getting a very straight break since the uneven, broken edges add charm.

Coloring the Shells

I used a gel food coloring (Betty Crocker Classic Gel Food Colors) to color the eggshells.  Since they were brown shells, the color did not turn out as clear and bright as they would have with white eggs, but that didn’t matter because this was just the base coat.  The interior of the shells turned out bright and pretty.  To add to the variety, I left a few shells undyed.

DIY Easter Decor: Egg Shell Planters and Vases, step two dying the egg

Adding Some Sparkle

I wanted my tiny vases to have some elegance and polish so they could be used even after Easter.  So I thinly coated the exterior of each shell with metallic craft paint (Dazzling Metallics “Dark Patina” and Martha Stewart Crafts Multi-Surface Metallic “Gold”), and then I squirted them lightly with water from a spray bottle.  I let the water run down the sides of the shells to create a mottled finish.

DIY Easter Decor: Egg Shell Planters and Vases, step three: adding some sparkle

Reinforcing the Shells

To make the shells crack resistant, I painted two coats of Mod Podge on the outside of each shell and one coat on the inside.  Although the shells were noticeably more stable after this, I still had to use care when working with them.

Making the Shells Stand Upright

Now I wanted the shells to stand upright.  So far I had only used materials that I already had around the house, so I wanted to continue doing that.

I am a bit of a vintage button weirdo, and for some strange reason I tend to hoard them.  So I glued vintage buttons to the bottom of each shell as a base.

DIY Easter Decor: Egg shell vases and planters, step 5: Adding a base

Adding Flowers and Tiny Plants

This was the funnest part of this fun project.  I used a small teaspoon to fill some of the shells with pre-moistened soil, and then I carefully planted tiny succulents.

DIY Easter Decor: Egg Shell Planters and Vases, step 6: planting the tiny plants

Other shells became vases for tiny flowers from my garden: Primroses and violets.  Of course I knocked a vase over by accident. It didn’t break, but I did discover that the food coloring does bleed into the vase water, so just a warning about that.

DIY Easter Decor: Egg Shell Planters and Vases, step six, adding the water and flowers

Table Decor and a Gift

I’m planning to have one on each place setting and then let my guests take them home.

DIY Easter Decor: Egg Shell Planters and Vases

 

DIY Easter Decor: Egg Shell Planters and Vases

2.  DIY Dinner Napkins: A Simple Project Just Got Simpler

Sometimes to get the table decor I want for a special occasion like Easter, I have to make my own dinner napkins.  And recently I decided to make some sets of dinner napkins to give as gifts. This is such a simple task:  Measure, cut, and hem the fabric. How could it get any simpler?

By eliminating the measuring and cutting.

While at the fabric store looking for an easy-care cotton fabric to use for my dinner napkin project, I found myself standing in front of the fabric quarters:  Those pre-cut pieces of cotton calico fabric that come in a wide variety of colors and patterns and measure 18 X 21 inches – just right for a dinner napkin.

DIY Easter Decor: Making an easy dinner napkin

But could I really just buy the fabric quarters and hem them?  It seemed too easy, so to make sure I asked a fabric store employee. She confirmed that since they were 100% cotton, they would indeed work as dinner napkins.

Solid-colored fabric quarters work best because they are double-sided.  With most patterned fabric quarters, the pattern only appears on one side and the opposite side is blank.

To iron, pin, and hem them took me less than 15 minutes per napkin, so making a set of six took under an hour and a half.

DIY Easter Decor: Making an easy dinner napkin

A set of six dinner napkins makes a great hostess gift.  I made two sets in one afternoon and bundled them using lace ribbon and vintage buttons.

fabric quarters - finished napkins1 wm

And I still made them with my own two little hands – even if I did take a shortcut.

3.  A Sweet Yet Practical Hostess Gift

You may not have time to make your own hostess gifts, but you can still give something handmade.  If you’ve been reading my blog for a while, you know that I love the soft and whimsical dishtowels that Cousin Lolli makes in her fabric studio in Fort Bragg.

For Easter, it’s hard to find anything more adorable than her carrot and bunny dishtowels. She created them using images from vintage children’s books.

Adorable handmade carrot and bunny dishtowel by Lolli Jacobsen, available on Etsy

Dishtowels are always a wonderful hostess gift, and they have the added bonus of being packable and unbreakable.  Most of Lolli’s dishtowels can be found on Etsy.


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