The June Bug Heads to Yosemite

Back in July, I talked about the makeover of our 1966 Airstream Caravel (aka “the June Bug”).  I also shared a bit about our brief camping trip to Deception Pass State Park.

Airstream Caravel with chili pepper lights

That trip was trial run to work out any glitches before our September road trip to Yosemite National Park.

Yosemite has been on my bucket list for a long time, and since we just returned I thought I would share a bit about that gorgeous place.

But first, a couple of recent improvements to the June Bug.

The June Bug:  A Work in Progress

With a vintage trailer, there is always something that needs fixing, doing, or improving.  So before our Yosemite trip, we ticked a couple of little things off of our “to do” list.

New Curtains

I’ve always disliked heavy, light-blocking window coverings.  For years I’d been meaning to do something about the curtains in the June Bug.

curtains over banquette

Good quality, but a little too drab and heavy for my liking.  In such a small space, we need to bring light in, not block it .

And I wanted something whimsical.  We only use the trailer a few weeks a year, so why not have some fun with it?

Of course there is no finding ready-made curtains for a 1966 Airstream.  But sewing them was easy. We chose an inexpensive calico print with ladybugs and daisies.

Curtains

Because the interior walls curve, we have a cable system to secure the curtains at the top and the bottom.  It’s similar to the system that we used for our burlap greenhouse shades.

I think the curtains also look sweet from the outside.

Trailer exterior with curtains

A New Kitchen Faucet

The trailer came with a very small kitchen sink and faucet.  We recently replaced the sink with a larger one, but that silly little faucet remained.  It was almost impossible to rinse pots and pans.

Sink with old faucet

So right before our road trip, we replaced it with a larger bar faucet.

Upgraded faucet

So much better.

Now were were ready to hit the road!  Hopefully.  With a vintage trailer, you never really know.

On the Way – Sort of

We headed south from Washington State but veered west to spend the first evening at Nehalem Bay State Park on the always-breathtaking Oregon coast.

Oregon coast sunset

Chris immediately set up one of the vintage lanterns that he has been collecting.

Coleman lantern in vintage airstream

Big Trees

Our next big stop was at Calaveras State Park in California, home to giant sequoias.  They are some of the oldest living things on Earth.

Giant sequoia

Yosemite!

The June Bug is only 17 feet long, so we sacrifice living space but gain convenience.  I think it’s a great trade off because we can camp in sites that are often inaccessible to larger RVs.

Chris had researched the various campgrounds at Yosemite and White Wolf was high on his list.

Initially, I was not thrilled to learn that White Wolf had no “facilities,” as far as water and electrical hookups, at the camp sites.  But we had a generator and propane, so it didn’t really matter.

And any reservations I had dissolved once saw the campground. Located at 8,000 feet, the camp sites were nestled among granite boulders.  The air smelled wonderful.  There was just something magical about this place.

White Wolf campground

And it was a great hub for enjoying high-country day hikes.

Of course it got cold at night, so a crackling campfire was always a plus and sometimes brought us visitors from other camp sites.

trailer at white wolf

These high-country campgrounds are open only a few months of the year.  By the time this post is published, all the tents and RVs will be gone, leaving nature to reclaim White Wolf until next summer.

The Little Things Matter

At Yosemite, everything seemed big to me.  The mountains were right there, and they were huge.  We learned that the towering El Capitan is the largest solid granite rock in the world.

But we also learned this fun little factoid:

Chipmunk, right?

golden mantled ground squirrel

Wrong.  He’s a golden-mantled ground squirrel.

This sporty little guy is a chipmunk.

Chipmunk

And he looks slightly insulted by our mistake.

I’ve decided that I’m not going to post any iconic big picture photos of Yosemite here because you’ve already seen the best of them by the likes of Ansel Adams and other great photographers.

Instead I thought it would be fun to zoom in on some of the small things that often get overlooked.

Like this little trace of past human presence, perhaps from an old farm or ranch, on a valley floor hike.

Yosemite valley hike

Or a rusty directional sign on a high-country hiking trail.

Yosemite hikers sign

Farther down the trail, the waters of Lukens Lake were still.

Lukens Lake Yosemite

And on our hike to Mt. Hoffmann, I was surprised to find the dreamy May Lake High Sierra Camp – a remote hike-in camp for backpackers.

May Lake High Sierra Camp

This camp was already closed for the season, and a small crew was winding things down.

tent at May Lake

During breaks, they create art on an old chopping block behind the kitchen.

bottlecaps

If you’re ever in Yosemite, I highly recommend a drive to Olmsted Point for sweeping views of the Sierra Nevadas.

And a walk among these otherworldly subalpine trees.

They are probably much older than they look.

Subalpine tree yosemite

Subalpine tree Olmsted Point Yosemite

One day we took a tour bus to the top of Glacier Point.  But we chose to hike back down.  There are two trails to choose from, and we chose the “Four-Mile Trail” which is actually almost five miles.

The switchbacks have old rock retaining walls which were likely installed by the Civilian Conservation Corps during the Great Depression.

glacier point hike Yosemite

A Ghost Town

We had planned to stop at other parks on our way back to Washington State, but there was so much to see at Yosemite and we stayed there too long.

We did manage to make a few quick stops on the way home, and the most interesting one was outside Yosemite’s east entrance:  The ghost town of Bodie.

It is a true ghost town – in the middle of nowhere.  The road to Bodie stretches on for miles.

Road to Bodie

Bodie is now a historical park and is kept in a state of “managed decay.”

Inside the abandoned homes, dust is undisturbed.

Bodie lounger

Bodie crib

Water damage is not repaired.

Bodie living room

Weathered exteriors are not repainted.

Bodie doorways

Bodie - walthy residence

Life in Bodie’s heyday was probably so much simpler yet harsher than life today.  There were several funeral directors and undertakers in town, which tells you something about life – and death – in Bodie.

Time To Head Home

Whenever we take a road trip with the June Bug, it takes me a few days to adjust to living in such small quarters.  But after that, I wish we could just stay on the road forever.

rearview mirror

About These Photos

I’m considering framing some of my favorite photos from this road trip – especially since my goal is to start rotating my wall art from time to time.

And I’m kicking off Story Time, my new shop over at Søciety6 with a few of the photos posted here. So if you enjoyed any of these photos and would like your own art print, or if you just want to browse, pop over and have a look.


You might also enjoy:


Linking up with:

14 thoughts on “The June Bug Heads to Yosemite”

  1. This makes me want to hit the road in a gypsy wagon. Instead, I’m often housesitting and cuddling cats in a beautiful Camano Island home with a view while the owners are off adventuring in their travel trailer. I guess I can’t complain.

  2. I really enjoyed your post and your pictures. I have been to Yosemite and would go again in a heartbeat! Especially enjoyed the animal pictures and the trees. Thanks!

    1. Karen, I can relate. We just got back and I already wish we could go there again. I’m so happy you enjoyed my post, and thanks so much for visiting!

    1. Mary, I remember you telling us a bit about your Yosemite trip – one of the reasons we put Yosemite so high on our list.

  3. You were in my neck of the woods in Ca.! I live just a couple of hours from Yosemite and have been there several times. It is so breathtaking and beautiful. I’m glad you got a chance to enjoy it!

    1. Pamela, you’re so lucky to live that close! Although September was a great time to visit, I would love to see Yosemite even later in fall. I have heard the fall colors there are just beautiful.

  4. How fun! I love June Bug!! June was my sweet mothers name. 🙂 We have been to lots of National Parks, but have not made it to Yosemite yet. On my bucket list. Glad you had fun! Thanks for sharing with SYC.
    hugs,
    Jann

    1. Jann, I feel like our trailer is extra lucky knowing that June was also your mother’s name. Thanks so much for stopping by and for hosting SYC.

    1. I didn’t even know about Bodie until another couple we talked to in Yosemite told us about it. What a find! Thanks for visiting, Jill!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *