A Laundry Room Remodel Progress Report

It’s been a while since I mentioned our laundry room remodel, which began in early February.  That was when my husband, Chris, and my brother, Dan, demolished walls and installed new plumbing, electrical, and heat.  They were on a roll!

Then came the winter colds, conflicting schedules, and vacations. I found a nice little laundromat near home.  It was in a fun walking neighborhood with good coffee and shops nearby.  So not having laundry facilities at home was fairly painless.

Still I’m happy to report that I don’t have to go there anymore.

The laundry room isn’t finished yet, but we’ve made enough progress to put the machines back.  Here is what’s been going on:

Vintage Texture for the Walls

We wanted to treat the walls with some sort of vintage-inspired texture.  I was considering floor-to-ceiling painted shiplap.  But, between the shiplap and the open shelves we planned to install, that might be too many horizontal lines.

Chris suggested beadboard.  Always a classic, but beadbord is most commonly used for wainscoting and rarely seen as a floor-to-ceiling wall cover.

Then I remembered some photos I’d seen on an Instagram account and blog called Vibeke Design.  Vibeke’s photos are so gorgeous they instantly lower my blood pressure. But now the backdrop for those photos had me thinking – that charming paneled wall.

Photo courtesy of Vibeke Design

It still looked like beadboard, but the wider-spaced planks somehow made it look more appropriate as a floor-to-ceiling wall cover.  We both loved the look, and we wanted to find it in easy-to-install 4X8 panels.

The big box stores didn’t carry them.  But we were able to special order panels from a locally owned lumber yard.  They arrived quickly, and they weren’t expensive.

For me, the panels were easy to install – because I didn’t install them. Chris did.  And if you read my previous post about this remodel, you already know that the laundry room walls are not sheetrock.  They are not even lath and plaster.  They are mortar and mesh.

Which basically means they are made of cement.

So Chris had to pre-drill every nail hole and keep track of where the drilled holes were located so he could secure the panels with screws.

This was his first attempt at something like this, and he did an amazing job.

Our house is old, so the walls are not straight or level.  But somehow Chris managed to hang the panels so that all the vertical lines look straight.

The panels were thin enough to hang flush with the original subway tile baseboard, which we wanted to keep.

New panels with original subway tile baseboard

Crown Molding

We found new crown molding that matches the original crown molding in the mudroom.

With crown molding installed, before paint.

 

Chris caulked the seams between the crown molding and the ceiling – and also between the wall panels.  Now I have to look hard to even find the seams.

The seams in each corner of the room will be covered later with a narrow cove molding.

Prep and Paint

Now the room was ready for me to paint.

The paneling looked gorgeous, and I was very nervous about messing it up with a mediocre paint job.  So I took my time with the prep work.

I did a lot of sanding, spackling, priming, cleaning, dusting and vacuuming.

Chris took the windows apart so they were easier for me to sand. He stripped decades of paint off of the window hardware.

He even cleaned the old cloth cords that attach to the lead window weights.  He worked on the 90-year-old windows until they opened like new.

I used the same trim paint we’d used in our kitchen remodel.

We’d had custom trim paint mixed to match the warm white of our new kitchen cabinets.  When I recently repainted our mudroom, I used the same trim paint there.  The laundry room can be seen and accessed from the mudroom, so the two rooms tie together nicely now.

I love that soft shade of white so much that I had more of the same paint mixed in a matte finish for the walls.

The panels were already primed white, so painting white over white eventually had me questioning my eyesight and my sanity.  I used a roller and then carefully backbrushed each groove and panel.  Of course multiple coats were needed. Or were they?  I couldn’t really tell.

I never actually finished the job, Chris just told me it was time to put the paint brush down and step away.

A Sink Base

The sink base we ordered for the laundry sink is the same brand, style, and color as the base for our kitchen sink.

We put the sink base, still in its wrapping, temporarily in place so we could get a sense of how deep the countertop will be and how we should space the open shelves.

We used blue tape to help us visualize spacing ideas for the shelves. The plywood helped us get a sense of what the countertop depth would be.

For months, we’d had the floors covered to protect them.  But now we were finally able to uncover them.  It was nice to see those beautiful refinished concrete floors that Kenji had worked so hard on.

Open Shelves

I had ordered discounted shelves from Home Decorators long before we’d even finished planning our laundry room remodel.

It was so exciting to finally see them on the wall.

Chris thought ahead on this one:  Knowing that we would be hanging these shelves, he’d earlier noted where the wall studs were located, and he placed additional bracing inside the wall so that we’d have something solid to screw these shelves into.

And then he mapped it all for future reference.

All so I could have my pretty shelves.  I’d ordered these shelves because, well, they were a screaming deal.  But more importantly they are shallow enough not to obstruct the window.

With the appliances placed against this wall, I’ll need a stepladder to reach almost anything stored here.  So these shelves will store things I won’t need  often – like shoe polish or jewelry cleaners. And these things can be in attractive containers or baskets.

I’ll stash the things I use often in the sink cabinet – and in a nifty new corner cabinet that my brother Dan will be building for us.  It will fit under this window on the opposite side of the laundry room.

I’m excited about this since Dan has made some beautiful built-ins for his own house.  Check out his dining room remodel, including a built-in china hutch.

Appliances

So the sink base has been hustled back out to the garage for the time being and, just a few days ago, Chris reinstalled our washer and dryer.

I wanted to hug them.

What’s Next

The washer and dryer will stay in their present locations.  The sink and sink base will go between them.  We considered other options such as stacking the washer and dryer or placing them side-by-side and putting the sink by the window.

But, right or wrong, we are hung up on the symmetry we’ll get by placing the sink in the middle.

There is more to come, including lots of little details like a drying rack over the sink, new window coverings, a new light fixture, all kinds of hooks, and more shelves on other walls.  But here are some of the bigger items:

A Sink

A stainless steel deep sink will go in the sink cabinet.

A Countertop

We’ll install a countertop over the washer/dryer and around the sink.  This should pull everything  together and provide lots of space to fold clothes.

A Corner Cabinet

Dan’s corner cabinet will give us storage without obstructing the flow of the room or taking up too much floor space.

A Built-in Ironing Board

This will probably go on the wall next to the dryer.

Before and Afters Coming

I still haven’t shown you what the laundry room looked like before all of this started.  Just for fun, have a look at the little mess that used to be where the new corner cabinet is going.

Once the remodel is finished (or close, anyway) I’ll post more before photos.  So stay tuned!

Posts on this blog are for entertainment only and are not tutorials.


My Laundry Wish List

Disclosure: Affiliate Links are used below.

Classic stainless fixtures make any laundry room feel clean and timeless.   I’m dreaming of these, although not all of them will work for our project.

Left to right:

Stainless Retractable Clothesline  | Ikea Wall Mount Clothes Drying Rack | Stainless Aero-W Folding Clothes Rack  | Trinity Stainless Steel Utility Sink


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18 thoughts on “A Laundry Room Remodel Progress Report”

  1. Wow, you are going to have the nicest laundry room in any cottage!!! What an amazing job you’ve done thus far, and obviously Chris is amazing at home remodel, what an organized plan he had! I can’t wait to see it finished, and I just know I’m going to be jealous! 🙂

    1. Thanks Debbie! I also can’t wait to see it finished 🙂 . Adding the little details at the end is going to be fun.

  2. Amazing. You two are a whole different species – the energy, imagination and skill you put into these remodels! So beautiful. Thanks for making my morning bus ride so enjoyable.

    1. Thanks Jane! We thought about it for a long time (probably too long) before we even started. I had those shelves forever. I’m so happy they look like I imagined they would.

  3. This is going to be an adorable laundry room! We used similar planking on the walls of our cabin (horizontal not vertical, however). It’s working very well in your laundry room. Love the shelves too!

    1. Thanks Melissa! I’m very curious to see that planking hung horizontal. Gonna visit your website and hope for photos!

  4. Wow, it looks amazing and functional. It looks like you get some really nice sunlight coming into that room too. That’s always a good thing. Can’t wait to see more.

  5. I have put off redoing my laundry room but yours is inspiring me so much. I can’t wait to see the final product. It is going to be one gorgeous laundry room. Thank you for sharing your progress with us at Vintage Charm.

  6. Your laundry room is /will be lovely, and so functional, too! Something to consider: an insert to cover an under-mount sink in the same material as the counter, to make the counter wall-to-wall. That would give you a more counter space and more flexibility. I’ve seen some great ones in tiny houses – I can’t claim credit for the ides. Good luck! Lenore

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