March Floral Inspiration: The Skagit Valley Daffodil Fields

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links, which means I receive a small commission if you make a purchase using these links.


Last month’s floral inspiration post featured a stunning floral sculpture – the result of one artist’s fanciful, intricate interpretation of a flowering tree. This month, we spin the dial in the opposite direction and visit the humble field daffodil before it is even plucked from the earth.  Well, not just one daffodil – fields and fields of them.

Yes, we are headed to Washington State’s Skagit Valley – home to some of the most prolific bulb farms in the U.S.  Most of these farms are owned by families that originated in Holland.

In April, many Washingtonians (including me) look forward to the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival, when the valley floor comes alive with colorful bands of blooming tulips.

tulips just starting to bloom - skagit valley
Tulips just starting to bloom in the Skagit Valley

Beating the Crowds

This popular attraction, now in its 33rd year, can get crowded.  So this year, I wanted to get ahead of the crowd and instead check out the La Conner Daffodil Festival, which takes place in March.  The driving route is almost identical to the tulip festival route, but the earlier-blooming daffodils are the main attraction.  Three major varieties of daffodils are grown in the fields.

Now, to convince my husband, Chris, to tiptoe through the, uh, daffodils with me, I had to throw in an element of adventure.

So I told him we could bike the daffodil route.

Heidi and Bikes - Daffodil fields of the Skagit Valley
Me with our bikes in the Skagit Valley

Our Day Among The Daffodils

We parked the car in La Conner, a quaint little town on the Swinomish Channel, and hopped on our bikes.

There was so much to see that it seemed we stopped every mile or so.

Red barn and daffodil fields
Chris in front of the red barn.

pastures, daffodil fields, and mountains

daffodil fields

Country setting

Biking the route was better than driving it because we really felt connected to the valley.  We could hear bird songs and see snow geese in the fields and hawks hovering overhead.

The Big Attractions

Our first big stop was Roozengaarde, a huge bulb farm with over 1,000 acres of fields growing tulips, daffodils and irises. Roozengaarde has a gift shop and a beautiful display garden.

Flowering trees, shrubs and bulbs at Roozengaarde
Flowering trees, shrubs and bulbs at Roozengaarde
Roozengaarde pink tulip
A short-stemmed tulip at Roozengaarde

Daffodils under a tree in Roozengaarde garden

Roozengaarde hyacynths
Hyacynths in the Roozengaarde display garden

And beyond the lawn behind the display garden, fields of daffodils seemed to stretch to the mountains.

Daffodil fields at RoozenGaarde with Mt. Baker in the background.
Roozengaarde daffodil field with Mt. Baker in the background

Next we rode to Tulip Town, another large farm that grows and sells bulbs and other perennials.  The fields of Tulip Town were starting to show signs of spectacular color to come.

Tulip Town ulip fields
Tulip fields at Tulip Town

By now we were starting to feel pressed for time, so we didn’t linger in Tulip Town as long as I would have liked.

Getting Distracted

We hit the road again.  And not that this has anything to do with daffodils, but we happened upon the cutest unexpected sight: Miniature donkeys!

miniature donkeys

The next stop was Christianson’s Nursery. This place really speaks to me because they have several historic structures on the nursery grounds that the owners have rescued from other locations.

My favorite is the Meadow School, built in 1888. It is still used for classes – gardening classes, that is, held by the nursery.

Meadow Schoolhouse Interior
Meadow School interior

I could have spent hours in their quaint gift shop.

Christianson's nursery gift shop
A gift shop at Christianson’s Nursery

And I also fell in love with their many vintage greenhouses, especially this one from the 1940s.

Christianson's nursery old greenhose

Christianson's nursery greenhouse interior

But we were getting hungry.  It was time to wrap up the 16-mile ride and head back to La Conner to find food.

Daffodils in the City

Flower vendors in Seattle’s Pike Place Market sell the fancier filled daffodils which come mostly from farms near the city of Carnation.

Pike Place Market flowers
Pike Place Market, Seattle

To me, their soft beauty rivals any peony or rose.

Filled daffodils

But I wanted to use regular field daffodils to fill this French pitcher* that Chris gave me for Christmas.

Field daffodils in blue pitcher

It took two grocery store bundles to fill the pitcher – $4 well spent.


*The blue pitcher is by Emile Henry.  This company specializes in kitchenware and bakeware.  For Christmas, Chris gave me a mix of vintage and new Emile Henry bakeware.  I love the look, the quality, and how easy the pieces are to clean.

Emile Henry is a French company, and most of their items are made in France.

A nice assortment of vintage Emile Henry can be found on Etsy.

orange emile henry
Photo courtesy of Coastal Maison



You might also enjoy:

 Linking up with:

8 thoughts on “March Floral Inspiration: The Skagit Valley Daffodil Fields”

    1. Glad you enjoyed it, Karen. I loved our day in the Skagit Valley. If you go on the weekend, there will probably be more traffic to contend with, but I’m guessing it’s still very fun biking.

    1. Jill, I’m so glad you enjoyed it – and thrilled that you are featuring this post. Thanks so much, and thanks for hosting “Let’s Talk Vintage!”

  1. What a beautiful place! I would love to visit one day. Those flowers are breathtaking. Thank you so much for stopping by Inspiration Thursday and sharing your photos!

    1. Thanks Lela. I don’t do these kinds of “travel-y” posts very often. But this one was well received, so I might do more in the future. Thanks so much for hosting Inspiration Thursday!

  2. Heidyour photos are spectacular. Thank you for taking me along for the ride. I would love to go in person someday. I loved Christianson’s Nursery with its historic Meadow School and vintage green houses. Thank you for sharing at Vintage Charm.

    1. Thanks, Sharon. If you ever do visit, the town of La Conner, where we started and ended our ride, is a nice destination too. Lots of cute shops and restaurants. Thanks for hosting Vintage Charm!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *