A Little Greenhouse in a Big Snow

Here in the Puget Sound region, we are just beginning to thaw out from the deepest February snow accumulation since 1916!  All around the area, schools and businesses were closed.  Kids rejoiced.  But most adults had mixed feelings – because, with all our steep hills, getting around in the snow can be pretty darn tricky.  

But this snow storm was nothing like the incredible cold that folks in the Midwest recently suffered through so, out of respect for those hardy souls, no sniveling words of self pity will appear in this post.

No, I just want to show you our greenhouse

Doesn’t it look cute in the snow?

Sunglo lean-to greenhouse in the snow.

Even though I kind of knew that our little Sunglo greenhouse was designed to withstand heavy snow, I never realized how well it would actually shed snow. 

Was it the curved roof line, the fact that we never let the interior temperature dip below 50 degrees, or a little of both?  I don’t really know.  But that greenhouse was the only thing in our garden that wasn’t covered in six to twelve inches of show.

It shrugged off the snow that fell on it.  

Sunglo lean-to greenhouse in snow.

 

 

Inside the greenhouse, things were cozy.  The plants were happy.

Inside a Sunglo greenhouse.

 

Inside a Sunglo Greenhouse.

 

The burlap shades we made for the greenhouse a few years ago are still holding up.

 

Burlap shades

And the vintage-inspired lights that my brother made for the greenhouse are still going strong.

Vintage-inspired lighting

It’s hard to believe that soon it will be time to start tomatoes and summer annuals in here.

A Snow Garden Mini Tour

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All the little garden chores that I hadn’t gotten around to were hidden under a thick blanket of white.  I took lots of photos.  So this is the perfect time to take you on a mini-tour of our garden. 

Snow makes everything beautiful.  Whether it’s a birdbath, 

winter garden

 

winter garden

 

A hedge,

winter garden

 

An old weeping cherry tree,

winter garden

 

A rustic bench,

winter garden

 

The back patio,

winter garden

 

 

Or just seed heads from the garlic chives, 

winter garden

Huge gobs of snow make it all look better.

 

 

Garden chores weren’t the only thing we’d been procrastinating on.  We’d left town soon after the holidays, so Chris never had a chance to take down our outdoor Christmas lights. 

But once the snow started falling, we just switched them back on.

Shed with Christmas lights

Christmas in February!  

But not everything was beautiful.  The hummingbird feeders were freezing over so quickly that it was a pain to keep them thawed.  I needed a quick solution.

So I insulated them with old socks.

And yes, the sock in the photo is inside out.  But this little guy is getting his food, so he doesn’t care.

Posts on this website are for entertainment only and are not tutorials or endorsements.

 

 

Want to see more? Browse my photo gallery or check out these categories:

Our Kitchen Remodel Series
Our Master Bath Remodel Series
Entertaining
My Shop
Dan’s Workshop
Decorating and Holidays
Our Little Sunglo Greenhouse
Floral Design
Garden Design
The June Bug Diaries
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8 Replies to “A Little Greenhouse in a Big Snow”

    1. Debbie, I never thought I’d have a greenhouse, but we actually found this one on Craigslist and then went to Sunglo to get an extension kit and some other parts to make it a few feet longer. It was a good way to go on a budget, and the folks at Sunglo were very helpful.

  1. Beautiful greenhouse and garden tour.
    Our hummingbirds migrate South in the Winter.
    Here, in Eastern Quebec, water freezes.
    The sock is a great idea for warmth. It’s nice to see the hummers in the snow. Take care

    1. Thanks Thelma, glad you enjoyed the tour! The sock did work for keeping the fluid from freezing too quickly, but I still had to thaw out the receptacles from time to time. I always admire our hardy little hummingbirds!

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