A Warm Welcome: A Porch Bench Gets a Budget Winter Makeover

A Lonely Porch

We use the bench on our covered porch almost every day in summer, but we never use it in winter.  The summer-print cushion is put away for the season and, except for one of our cats occasionally using it as a lookout post, the bench sits idle.

I have always had a fantasy about sitting on the porch in winter, bundled up with a hot chocolate watching snow fall.  But this has never happened.

Creating a Warmer Welcome

I started to wonder if we would use the bench more in winter if it was simply made cozier and more appealing.  So I decided to give it a try.

This is not the most practical idea I’ve ever come up with.  After all, even though the porch is covered, the fabric used on the bench would still be exposed to some winter weather.

But if I used a truly weatherproof fabric, it would not feel warm and comfortable, which would defeat the purpose.

So I went to Goodwill on Black Friday and for a song I bought a used sweater to convert into a soft pillow and a green fleece throw to convert into a cushion cover.

winter decorations - textile closeup

And if the weather has its way with them, oh well.  They are expendable.

For the holidays, I combined them with a Christmas pillow and a red throw.

bench1

After the holidays, they can be combined with other accessories and continue to create a warm and welcoming look for visitors – and us.

It’s day one of the new look, and Priscilla the Cat is already using the bench more.  We will see if her humans follow suit.

From Scraps to Sachets

The leftover sweater scraps were kind of charming and calling out to be used for something.

So I made these sachets with them for stocking stuffers.

sachets2

I used slices of scented soap to fill them.

It’s fun to repurpose old items.  I’m planning more projects like this with other used fabrics.


Sources:

Projects in this post were sewn with my Brother CS6000i sewing machine.

Affiliate links used.


You might also enjoy:

 

 

 

Three Festive Lighting Ideas for the Holidays and Beyond

I always have a hard time following the unwritten rule of taking down the Christmas lights after the new year.

What a silly rule.  The days are short and gloomy and the fun of the holidays is over.  Seems like that is when we really need a little cheerful lighting to lift our spirits.

Well this year, I found a few simple and classy lighting ideas that can continue to shine all winter – and even beyond.

Charming

With these pretty strands of mini lights on bendable, silver-toned wire, it’s easy to create all sorts of sweet little vignettes.  The tiny LED lights have a warm white glow.

Christmas Lighting Ideas tips - angel with microlights

They have a battery pack that can easily be hidden.  In the photo above, the battery pack is under the angel.

They are fun for lighting up arrangements where a corded light would be unsightly or impossible.  In the photo below, the battery pack is hidden under a pine cone.


Christmas Lighting Ideas tips - micro LED lights

I’m looking forward to using them in centerpieces and for special occasions year-round.


Christmas Lighting Ideas tips - LED Lights with mirror

The creative possibilities for these tiny lights are endless.

The batteries last 48 hours, and there is an on-off switch on the battery pack.  So it’s best to place the battery pack where it can be easily reached.

Nostalgic

Now that our greenhouse is almost finished, I am very eager to find the right lighting and have been imagining something involving old-fashioned, Edison-style filament bulbs.

I came across a strand of glass Christmas lights that gave me the look instantly.

Christmas Lighting Ideas Edison style vintage bulbs

I just love the industrial vibe they lend – perfect for a greenhouse.

Christmas lighting ideas Edison bulbs old fashioned

I will leave these lights in the greenhouse until I find permanent lighting.

Although they are marketed as Christmas lights, their simple design can easily work year-round.  I’m looking forward to using them in summer for evening garden parties.

Winter

Right before Thanksgiving, something unfortunate happened to my mother, Erika:  She walked into a store and was exposed to an excessive display of gaudy Christmas decorations, causing her to come down with an early case of “holiday overload.”

So she decided to take a year off from having a conventional Christmas tree.  Instead, she used some fresh, green branches from a curly willow and some small white lights to create this wintry look.

Christmas Lighting Ideas - winter tree

She placed a metal grid inside a large plastic pot to anchor the branches and then poured in sand to give the base some weight and to help keep the branches in place.

Since this is not a Christmas tree, she can keep this look long after the new year.  So “holiday overload” isn’t all bad.


Sources:

Affiliate links used


You might also enjoy:

The Foraged Wreath

One of the many things I love about living in the Pacific Northwest is being able to find greens for holiday decorating right in my own garden.

An Easy DIY Christmas Wreath

It’s fun to make your own wreath, and it’s easier than it looks.

Where to Find The Greens

Often you can get free scraps of evergreen branches where Christmas trees are sold.  If you want more variety in your wreath, some nurseries also sell boughs of assorted evergreens and berries.

But I check my garden first for evergreen branches, berries, pinecones, and interesting mosses.

If you don’t have a garden, ask a neighbor or friend with one if they can spare a few cuttings.  If you don’t live in an area with evergreens, can you find other local greens or natural elements that would make an interesting wreath?

Materials and Supplies

To start with, you just need a wreath form, florist wire (found at craft stores), wire cutters, greens, and garden pruners.  Once your wreath starts to take shape, you will get a good sense of what other kinds of decorations you might want to add.

DIY Christmas Wreath - what you will need

Let’s Get Started

There are many ways to construct a wreath, and this is just my method.  I like to use drapey greens that hang nicely on either side of the wreath and meet at the bottom.

Cut the greens into about six-inch lengths and bundle them, at the cut ends, into small handfuls using the wire.

bundled greens
A handful of greens ready to be attached to the wreath form.

Securely attach the bundles to the wreath form at the cut ends using more wire.

Start at the bottom and work your way up, overlapping the greens you are adding over the ones already secured so that you are always hiding the wire from the previous bundle.  The wired cut ends should be up and the uncut loose ends pointing down.

Work your way to the top in this manner and then start again at the bottom and cover the other side, working your way up.

At the top, you will wind up with some wire showing, and this is a good place to put a bow or other decoration that covers those wires.

You can make your wreath as dense or as loose as you like, and with the wire you can add your other decorative elements.

My Wreath

This year I’m craving decorations that look natural and unpretentious, and it shows in my wreath.

DIY Christmas Wreath

One of these days I will make a wreath that is actually round and symmetrical.  But I just love a drapey, whimsical wreath.  I added large pinecones and longer greens at the bottom.

Small gold bells on wires are the only touch of glamour.  Now the wreath jingles softly as the door is opened.

wreath closeup

A Simple Garland

With a branch of the leftover greens, I made this garland.

DIY GarlandRight now I have a crush on these little white bells on jute twine, and I’ve been looking for ways to use them.

I tried them on the wreath, but they didn’t look right.  So making a wreath does involve a little experimentation, but that is all part of the fun.


Sources*:

I used my Fiskars Pruners for cutting the greens because they are very easy on my hands.  They are a great gift for any gardener, in fact these are going to someone on my Christmas list this year!

*Affiliate links used.


You might also enjoy:


Linking up with:

 

Heidi’s December Plant Pick: Golden Euonymus

Golden Euonymus

With so many great shrubs that provide winter color and structure, it was tough to decide on one for my December plant pick.

But when I came across this striking Golden Euonymus (Euonymus japonicus ‘Aureomarginatus’), I knew I had a winner.

I’m not usually a huge fan of plants with variegated leaves.  But this beautiful combination of the soft buttery yellow with the dark green on shiny leaves can brighten any gloomy winter’s day.

Euonymus
Golden Euonymus

A Versatile Beauty

Golden Euonymus can thrive as a container plant on a porch or deck or it can be planted in the garden to add a splash of color.

For an even more striking display of color, it can be used as a hedge.

Un-sheared, it reaches about six feet in height and width.  But it tolerates shearing very well (although this should not be done in freezing weather).  It can be shaped to add structure to your garden or, if it’s in a container, to lend a more formal look.

Year-Round Color

Golden Euonymus is an evergreen shrub that looks beautiful all year.  The colors hold best if it’s planted in full sun, but it can tolerate part shade.

Care

Golden Euonymus does well in hardiness zones 7-9.  It does need regular water and well-drained soil.  It tolerates salty soil and marine air.

Fertilize with a well-balanced fertilizer in spring.  This plant is fairly disease resistant and also deer resistant.


You might also enjoy:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kitchen Remodel Part 2: Ghosts of Kitchens Past

Interest in mid-century homes is rising as a new generation is coming to appreciate their open, innovative floor plans and uncluttered charm.

Mid-Century Gone Bad

But there is also a dark side to mid-century carpentry:  During the Mad Men era, unfortunate things were happening to older homes in the name of “modernizing.”  They were being stripped of their original charm and left with little else.

One example is the elegant dining room in my brother and sister-in-law’s 1908 home.  It stood shrouded in mediocrity for over 50 years after a bland mid-century remodel.

Another example is our own kitchen.  As I mentioned in my post Kitchen Remodel Part 1, the original kitchen in our 1927 bungalow was sliced in half by a wall in the 1950s as part of an unfortunate remodel.

The purpose of the remodel:  To turn the space on one side of the wall into a cramped galley kitchen with a lowered ceiling.  And to turn the space on the other side of the wall into a confusing interior room, essentially a wide hallway, which Chris and I referred to as “the Weird Room.”

Why was this ever done?  The answer is lost to time.

Kitchen remodel: Before with two rooms and dividing wall
The wall in the middle with the Weird Room on the left and the kitchen on the right
Kitchen remodel: north side before
Small galley kitchen

After several years of living with the space and planning the remodel, it was finally time to tear down that wall and bring the kitchen back to its original size.

I could not wait for this wall to come down so we could see the whole space as one big room!

Stories from the Past

Chris enjoys a good demolition project, and he arranged to work with a demo crew to remove the wall and take the whole space down to the studs and ceiling joists.

Turns out you can learn a lot about a house by tearing out an old remodel.  As the wall came down, the stories unfolded.

The Hidden Closet

While tearing down the Weird Room wall, the crew came across a little broom closet had been walled over and forgotten.

Someone must have thought, “Who needs closet space anyway?”  And why make the space part of the room when you can just wall it over and not have to use that pesky square footage?

kitchen remodel closet found during demolition of old remodel
The greenish paint marks the closet area. You can see the little light fixture on the wall near the top.

When the crew uncovered the closet, the little light fixture in it still worked.

Unfortunately the closet was pretty damaged at this point so it had to be removed, but it did add some space for our new kitchen that we hadn’t counted on – just right for a planning desk.

A Coincidence . . . or Something Else?

When the demo crew brought down the part of the wall nearest the dining room, an old newspaper fell out.  The date: November 12, 1952.  Now we had an approximate date for the unfortunate remodel.

But that wasn’t the eerie part.  Can you guess?

Yes, the day that Chris and his crew tore down that wall was also November 12.

I decided to take that as a good sign.

Squaring Off the Past

Many houses from the 1920s have coved ceilings and arched doorways.  When we bought the house, it had a coved ceiling in the living room, but the entrances to the dining room and the kitchen were squared off, not arched.

We always thought that was weird since, as a design scheme, coved ceilings and arched doorways usually go hand in hand.  We suspected that the squared-off entrances were not original but part of the mid-century remodel.

The demo project proved our suspicions to be correct.  When the crew reached the wall that separated the kitchen from the dining room, they uncovered evidence that the doorway had once been arched.

We had already planned to change the squared entrances to arches as part of the kitchen remodel, but this at least confirmed that we were actually returning an original feature to the house.

Raising the Ceiling

Perhaps as important as tearing down the wall was tearing off the lowered ceiling in the galley kitchen and bringing the space back to its original height.

In this photo the original ceiling is exposed.  You can see the line where the greenish paint ends.  That is where the lowered ceiling was hung, almost down to the window frame.

kitchen remodel - original ceiling height exposed during demolition of old remodel
Original ceiling height exposed.

By the paint line we could also see that the original cabinets went all the way up to the ceiling – a feature that we later repeated with new cabinets.

Here is a full demo photo of the same area, taken to the studs and joists.  We were happy to see the framing was still in good shape.

kitchen remodel studs and joists exposed after demolition
Taken down to the studs.

Let There be Light

The dark and gloomy Weird Room was finally gone!  The former dividing wall would have been right about in the center of this photo.

Kitchen remodel - original chimney stack exposed after demolition of older remodel
The wall is gone!

You can also see the brick chimney stack and pipe vent for the original kitchen stove – located in the area of the former Weird Room.  This leaves no doubt that the entire space was once the kitchen.

Now that the wall was gone, the room looked so light and spacious.  Daylight was streaming in and this entire space would soon be one nice bright kitchen again.

Kitchen Remodel - demolition of older remodel complete - ready to rennovate!
Full demo. The two little vents to the left of the window were for the original cold pantry.

More to Come

Check out Part 3, featuring before and after photos of our remodel.  I will also cover how not to starve during a major kitchen remodel.  So stay tuned!


Featured image courtesy of the Seattle Municipal Archives, Image #13672

For more on our kitchen remodel, check out:



You might also enjoy:


Linking Up With:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Greenhouse Sneak Peek

Sunglo lean-to

We have a new feature in our garden:  A portal to the tropics.  This morning the temperature outside was under 30 degrees, and when I walked through the portal it was 62 degrees, heated by the sun.  By noon it was over 70.

If you read my post Greenhouse on the Brain, you already know that I’m talking about the little Sunglo lean-to greenhouse that we bought used and disassembled on Craigslist.

My husband, Chris, and our talented friend, Bruce, who also worked on our master bathroom remodel and kitchen remodel, worked for over a week in rain and freezing temperatures to prepare the site and assemble the greenhouse.

It’s not quite finished, but I’m already so happy with it that I wanted to give you a sneak peek and show you the process.

Making it Fit

A lean-to greenhouse is basically one-half of a greenhouse that attaches to the side of a building.  Ours would be attached to the south side of our garage, where our vegetable garden was.

Site of future greenhouse
SIte of future greenhouse

The greenhouse we bought on Craigslist would measure about 5′ X 10′ when assembled.  But that wasn’t long enough to cover both of the windows on the south side of the garage, and the greenhouse would have to be placed off-center on the garage wall, which wouldn’t look right.

Going Shopping  at Sunglo

Luckily Sunglo is located in Kent, Washington – a short drive from our house.   So we arranged to pick up a 2.5 foot extension kit.  This would bring the length of the greenhouse to 12.5 feet, which would cover both garage windows.

I have to add here that Sunglo greenhouses are over 90% made in America and many of its components are actually manufactured right there in Kent.  So we felt pretty good about buying this product and supporting the local economy.

Of course while we were there we had to add a few upgrades to our greenhouse, like a nice little cedar shelf to replace a wire shelf.  We needed a few other parts, and most of them were machined while we waited.

Preparing the Site

Chris and I removed all the plants, part of the walkway, and much of the soil next to the garage to level the site.

Site prepared for Greenhouse
Space prepared for construction.

Next, Chris and Bruce measured out the foundation area of the greenhouse and sunk concrete pillars with brackets to hold the foundation.

For the foundation, they used pressure-treated 4X12 lumber.  The 12″ foundation would add the height needed so that the greenhouse would be tall enough to cover the top of the garage windows.

 

Greenhouse foundation
Chris and Bruce working on the foundation

Framing was added to the garage wall so the greenhouse could attach to it.  Attaching framing to an 80-plus year old stucco structure was tricky because nothing was level, so Bruce had to pull a few magic tricks out his hat to make this work.

Next they brought in lots of sand as the subfloor and placed concrete pavers over the side that would get foot traffic and gravel over the side where the potting bench would be located.

Flooring for greenhouse
Chris stops to take a break after installing pavers

They brought in two sources of water: a wall faucet for a small hose, and a stub for a future drip irrigation system.  They also  brought in electricity.

They even installed a small patio outside the greenhouse door.

Assembling the Greenhouse

Finally, they could start assembling the greenhouse and we could see it taking shape.  I just love the curved roof design.  It gives it so much character.

Greenhouse walls installed

Chris and Bruce got lots of advice and information about the assembly process from the helpful folks at Sunglo.  Things were getting very interesting as each panel was installed and the greenhouse came together.

Sunglo greenhouse being assembled
Teamwork!

It still needs some work around the door frame and a few finishing touches.  It will have a built-in cedar potting bench with a soil basin and small cedar shelf above that.  But here is the interior at this point.

Sunglo greenhouse interior

It also has automatic heating and cooling.  If it gets too warm, a fan on the west side automatically comes on and a vent on the east side opens.  Pretty nifty!  There are also a couple of manual vents.

Sunglo greenhouse control panel
Command central

Chris couldn’t resist wrapping his creation in Christmas lights.

Sunglo greenhouse with Christmas lights

I just can’t wait to find the right interior lighting for this adorable little greenhouse, something industrial yet attractive.

In spring we will be carving out a new vegetable garden around the greenhouse to blend it into the landscaping.   We might also do some kind of façade over the wood foundation, or paint it.

Sunglo greenhouse

I have already put a few plants in there and they seem very happy.  But warm as it was in there on this cold day, I’m tempted to kick them out and put in a couple of comfy chairs, a coffee maker and a wine cooler.

Is that so wrong?


You might also enjoy:


 

 Linking Up With:

 

 

 

 

Button Up These Pretty Jewelry Organizers

My Vintage Button Obsession

A while back, I was at an antique show not feeling very inspired when I came across a jar of old assorted buttons.

For some reason it caught my attention and since then I have been a bit obsessed with old buttons.  If you buy the right jar, you could wind up with a little treasure trove of tiny works of art – mother of pearl, Bakelite, wood, glass.

DIY holiday gift idea using vintage buttons

Each one holds a secret as to what great old garment it might have been on.  An Edwardian wedding gown?  A flapper’s little black dress?

A Great DIY Gift Idea – Or to Keep!

Of course if you had some really cool old buttons you would want to display them.  But how about displaying them on an attractive piece of décor that takes up only wall space and also helps you organize your jewelry?

Something so pretty and practical that it would also make a great gift – that is if you can bring yourself to give it away?

You only need a few supplies and a little time to make this fun earring hanger.

DIY holidat gift idea - earring hanger
Earring hanger

 

Or a necklace hanger.

DIY holiday gift idea - necklace hangers
Necklace hangers

Round Up The Supplies

First you’ll need a frame.  Not a fancy frame, but something very plain with a good flat surface that you can easily glue buttons to.

You will need craft paint or spray paint if you want to paint your frame.

If you’re painting over wood or over a dark color, you might have to prime the frame before painting.

You will also need craft glue.

If you’re making an earring hanger, you will need a medium to heavy-duty staple gun, wire cutters, and some quarter-inch mesh screen (found in hardware stores).

For the necklace hanger, use small hooks instead of the mesh screen.  You might also need to drill holes for the hooks if they don’t screw easily into the frame.

And of course you will need buttons.  Some vintage buttons are highly collectible and you can spend a pretty penny on them if you are so inclined.  But you can also find jars or bags of old buttons at thrift stores and antique stores at bargain prices.

Sometimes jars of buttons are sorted by color, so think about an overall color scheme and the look you would like to achieve for your frame.  This is the fun part!  Just keep in mind you can only use buttons with flat backs or they won’t adhere to the frame very well.

The How-To

You have probably already guessed that this project is very easy.  It’s also lots of fun.

First, paint the frame and let it dry.

For the earring hanger, you will need to use the wire cutters to cut the mesh screen to size so that it fits inside the frame.  If you look at the back of the frame, there should be about a half-inch recessed rim around the inside and this is the area you want your screen to fit into.

Attach your screen to the frame by stapling it to this rim.

DIY holiday gift idea
Back of earring hanger

If you’re making the necklace hanger, get small hooks from the hardware store in a finish you like and screw them into the frame from the back, as shown in this photo.

DIY holiday gift idea
Back of necklace hanger – note the location of the hooks.

You want to be able to hang necklaces on the hooks, so make sure you get hooks large enough if you will be hanging bulkier necklaces like pearls.

Then the creativity starts:  Then lay the buttons out on the frame in a pattern that you like and glue them on.

DIY holiday gift idea - button art
A wide variety of shapes, sizes and colors of buttons were used for this necklace hanger.

Attach a picture hook or hanger to the back of the frame if it doesn’t have one.

I love projects that repurpose used materials in unique ways.  These hangers were made using second-hand frames from the thrift store and of course the old buttons.

They are a great way to display collections of vintage jewelry.

Not as hooked on buttons as I am?  Skip them and just use a pretty little frame.


You might also enjoy:


Linking up with:

 

 

 

Setting a Formal Table: Lessons from an English Manor House

One of the reasons I love holiday meals is that they are a great excuse to bring out the fine china, crystal, and silverware and set a beautiful formal table.  Why not enjoy a little old-world elegance once in a while?  And there are many great sources on setting a formal table – Martha Stewart, Emily Post, plus dozens of online templates.

But my favorite source on formal table settings is someone who actually worked in the dining room of an English manor house in the 1950s – my own mom, Erika.

One Less Mouth to Feed

Food was still scarce in Germany in the mid-1950s so, without knowing a word of English, Mom left home to work in England.  She figured this would give her parents one less mouth to feed.

Of course Mom was not a British citizen, so the only jobs available to her were in domestic service. She arranged to take a position working in a manor house for an elderly lady.

Mom has some very amusing stories to tell about working in such a formal environment, and she has agreed to share with us a few of her recollections.

Life in a Manor House

The impressive manor house was intimidating. I thought I would be one of many servants — something like Downton Abbey.  But except for a cook who hated Germans, I was the only help.

Mrs. Bostock needed a lot of attention and most of the  time I couldn’t understand what she was saying.  Once in a while her son, who spoke German, came to visit and explained her wishes to me .  There was no doubt that she expected to be treated like royalty.

I had two uniforms.  One was a gray dress with a full white-and-gray striped apron for doing morning chores. The cook brought Mrs. Bostock her breakfast in bed while I did the daily cleaning.

At noon I changed into a black dress with a little white apron to serve her lunch and high tea at five. I always had to be on call as she often wanted an assortment of cheeses later, again with formal place settings.

Arranging the silverware was confusing at first—some of the pieces I had never heard of or seen before.  But I quickly realized there is a proper tool for every food served.  Once I learned which tool went with which food, I had no problem. 

Mrs. Bostock’s meals consisted of many different courses.  Each course required a different spoon, fork, or knife—at least ten inches of elegant silverware on each side of her plate.  All for an old lady who lived alone.

The cook would give me the menu so I could match the appropriate silverware. It became easier once I remembered the order in which the food was served, starting with a melon spoon and little knife set on the extreme right and left of her plate.  Each course thereafter, the corresponding silverware was on the far outside of the place setting as she worked her way in. 

But no matter what was served, a little spoon came along with the palate cleanser between each course—the only spoon not set out ahead of time.

Numerous crystal glasses, each for a different wine or beverage, were also placed in a certain sequence. A different wine was served with each course.

Food was never set on the table, but served from the left and used plates were taken from the right, most of them still half-filled.

When Mrs. Bostock had enough of one course, she sat back and raised her eyebrows, a signal for me to take the used plate and silverware.  No words were ever spoken. This went on all through the lengthy meals, taking all of two hours each.

Thank God I didn’t have to do the dishes.


I hope you enjoyed reading a little about Mom’s manor house days.  She is in the process of developing her own blog with many more stories about her life in England.  I will be sharing the link to her blog once it goes live.


You might also enjoy:

 

 

A Simple and Pretty Thanksgiving Table Setting

Do You Ever Feel Like Bringing The Outdoors In?

Maybe it’s because I recently reupholstered my dining chairs, but this year I felt like going in a different direction with my Thanksgiving table setting.

I was already craving the soothing colors of nature, and I always want to blur the line between indoors and outdoors – without sacrificing comfort, of course.

But I also started thinking about how a contrast of different textures – rough natural textures with polished manmade materials – is so interesting and brings balance to any design.

Budget-Friendly Ideas

I got a plain, inexpensive jute table runner – just the natural texture and color that I was looking for.

The tablecloth is discounted fabric yardage that I hemmed.  You can’t tell from the photos, but the fabric is very smooth and has just a touch of shimmer.  So now I have my polish.

For the napkins, I scored some 99-cent bandanas in chartreuse green – a pop of color to wake up the soothing earth-toned palette, but still itself a color found in nature.

Old School Elegance

My dining table is a bit small, so for dinner parties I have to be sure not to over-clutter it with decorations.  Instead I have to make every piece count.

So I am using our antique china, crystal, and silverware to lend some elegance to the setting.  The antique plates are also slightly smaller than modern-day plates, so the spacing between place settings doesn’t look crowded.

The Centerpiece

For the centerpiece, I took a small fishbowl I got at a thrift store and lined it with florist moss.  Then I tucked reindeer moss in where there were any holes or gaps in the florist moss.

Then I set a small vase inside the fishbowl, hidden by the moss.  The vase will hold the flowers.

Then to continue contrasting natural texture to polished materials, I used long-stemmed roses, always so buttoned-up and formal-looking, as the main flower.  I used millet seed heads and wild iris seed pods from the garden as the rough natural contrast.

Thanksgiving table setting - ingredients for floral arrangement

 

Thanksgiving Table Setting: Centerpiece

 A Relaxing Feast

The result is an uncluttered, elegant Thanksgiving table setting.

Thanksgiving Table Setting - Closeup

Be sure to check out my companion post about formal table settings, where we will hear from an expert who worked in “domestic service” at a manor house in England.  She has some very entertaining stories!

Affiliate links used.



You might also enjoy:

 


Linking up with:

 

 

 

 

Growing Paperwhites for a Beautiful Holiday Centerpiece

A Holiday Tradition

Growing paperwhite bulbs for the holiday season is one of my traditions.  Paperwhites are so fragrant, and they are so easy to grow.  Best of all, they can be grown in all kinds of fun containers, so the creative possibility are endless.

Paperwhites are a bulb, a variety of narcissus, and they can be forced to bloom indoors during winter.  If timed right, they can be blooming gloriously in your home just in time for the holidays.

Think Outside the Box

I’m sure you have seen the paperwhite kits in home and garden stores.  They come in a box and include some bulbs, a container, and planting medium.

But if you want to get more creative, it’s easy to learn how to pot paperwhites using your own container.

Potting Up Your Customized Paperwhite Container

First, pick a container that you love.  The only requirement is that it is water tight and a couple of inches deep.

With such limited requirements, you can have all kinds of fun with this.  Use a vase, a teacup, a gravy boat, a trifle bowl.

Here are just a few containers that I have used to pot up paperwhite bulbs.

Growing paperwhites - choosing a container
Paperwhite containers – the possibilities are endless

Growing paperwhites

You don’t need soil for paperwhites.  They grow best in just pebbles and water.

You can find a wide variety of decorative natural or glass pebbles in the floral department of most hobby stores.

Is your container all glass?  Then choose a highly decorative pebble since it will be seen.

If the container is not glass, then in some cases you can just use unglamorous walkway gravel (example to follow).

Next you will need the paperwhite bulbs.  For just the bulb and not the whole boxed kit, the best place to go is a garden center or nursery.

Make sure the bulbs you buy are for indoor forcing.  Ask if you have any doubt.  There are many new varieties of paperwhites for indoor forcing.  I  have always had the most reliable luck with the most common one, Paperwhite ‘Ziva.’

Plan on spacing the bulbs at last a half-inch apart in the container, so buy your bulbs accordingly. I have found that as long as they are not touching each other, the bulbs don’t mind being crowded in a container, and it makes for a fuller display.

So now that you have what you need, let’s start potting.

Just put the potting medium (pebbles, gravel, or glass beads) into your container at least a couple of inches deep and space the bulbs on top of the medium.

Then add just a little more medium to hold the bulbs in place.  Most of the bulb should still be above the surface.

Here are two examples:

Growing paperwhites. Starting in amber bowl
Starting paperwhite bulbs in amber bowl.
Growing paperwhites: Starting bulbs in green vintage bowl
Paperwhite bulbs in vintage container

You can see how the bulbs are spaced.  The bulbs in the green container are in plain old walkway gravel because I intend to put decorative moss over the gravel later to finish the look.

Once the bulbs are set in, just fill the container with water until it reaches the bottom of the bulbs.  They need to have access to the water but not be  submerged in it.

Nap Time

Once your paperwhites are potted and watered, you can put them in a cool, dark place for a week to take a nap.  But I have skipped this step entirely and it didn’t really impact the bulbs that much.

Once they have been in the dark for week, bring them into the light, somewhere in your house not too warm but near a window.  By now you should see that the bulbs have started to sprout.  Make sure the roots always have water.

It’s Five O’Clock Somewhere

Once the growth on the bulbs gets about four inches tall, your paperwhites are of drinking age and can have a cocktail.  Seriously.

This step isn’t for everyone and feel free to skip it if you like.  But feeding your paperwhites a little alcohol will stunt the root growth making the plant less gangly and less likely to lean over, yet not impacting how nicely it will bloom.

Give them the hard stuff – 40-proof clear, uncolored booze, diluted with water.  Cheap vodka is a good choice.

Mix one part booze to seven parts water.  If they still have water in their container and you are just topping off, then their first drink can be one part booze to five parts water.

A Little Support

Even with the booze, the paperwhites might lean toward the light so you might have to stake them.  I use decorative artificial berry sprigs (found at craft stores) for stakes since they add a little color to the arrangement.

Potting paperwhite bulbs - using florist berrie as stakes
Most hobby or craft shops carry these decorative berries around the holidays.
Potting paperwhite bulbs - craft berries as stakes - closeup
The berries have wired stems so you can bend them around any leaf or blossom that is leaning.

Finally in Bloom

Here are is my amber glass paperwhite container four and a half weeks after the bulbs were potted.

 

Growing bulbs - after 4.5 weeks

 

And here is the green vintage container where I used plain old walkway gravel.  Now the gravel is covered with moss and other natural accents.

 

Bulbs at 3-5 weeks closeup of moss

I wanted the arrangement to look like something growing naturally on the forest floor.

Paperwhites usually boom four to six weeks after they are potted, and continue to bloom for at least a week and usually much longer.

After they are done blooming, they won’t bloom again so you can throw them in the compost bin with no guilt.

I plant several paperwhite containers at intervals during the winter so I always have them booming.

But then again, I am a little obsessed with them.

Posts on this website are for entertainment only.

 


You might also enjoy:


Linking up with: